Yes, stereo is definitely an option.

With the older L1 Model 1s and Model II, running in stereo was a lot more challenging than traditional powered speakers.  The only simple mixer option made for the Bose L1 at the time was the T1 Tonematch mixer.  It was mono, but to run that in stereo was a real mission requiring you to adjust settings, send a signal to the AUX out independently of the MASTER out.

With the introduction of the T4s and T8s digital mixers which have dual MASTER out (or – left and right, stereo), suddenly stereo became a lot easier.

But do you really NEED to run in stereo?

The downsides to running “stereo” as a DJ or band

  1. Unless they’re in the “sweet spot”, your audience won’t get stereo. If they’re not dead centre of the dancefloor, they’ll get predominantly more of either the left or right channel.  They probably won’t notice.
  2. You can get bass cancellation if the subwoofers are too close together.
  3. You will get cancellation (particularly less bass) if the L1 speakers are too close together if you end up running “dual mono”, ie exactly the same signal on both speakers. Bose recommends spacing the two speakers 6 metres apart.
  4. Even in stereo, you’d want to try to put the subwoofers together to avoid cancellation.

 

I’ve been using the Bose L1 systems since 2007.  Be it a Compact, a Model 1, L1 Model II, or the 1s, and now the Pro8, Pro16 and Pro 32.  I’ve only needed a pair on less half a dozen occasions.  Unless it’s a massive room or huge crowd, the long throw and wide dispersion of of the L1 system means two “sticks” really is often just overcomplicating matters with no real advantage, certainly none that the client/audience will ever notice.

 

 

 

 

Nick Logan – Corporate and wedding DJ 

Running in stereo is probably a lot easier now with the new L1 Pro series, you can use them without the Tonematch mixer.